Think Pair Share

AllGrades_GraphicOrganizer_ThinkPairShareTemplate

This is a graphic organizer to aid in a think pair share for any grade level. Students are given a section to rewrite the question and state their answer, a section with a sentence starter to construct their claim and provide evidence, and a section to record a partner’s thoughts.

Microsoft Word version: GraphicOrganizer_ThinkPairShareTemplate

PDF version: GraphicOrganizer_ThinkPairShareTemplate

Gr 5_OA_PropertyOddEvenSums_ThinkPairShare_Critique

This task is a think-pair-share activity designed for fifth graders learning about properties of numbers, specifically odd numbers. Students are given a statement about odd numbers and must determine whether they agree or disagree with the statement. A template is given for students to make a claim and provide an argument to back the claim. Students must then consult with a partner and compare arguments. Students will use knowledge of the properties of both odd and even numbers.

Microsoft Word version: 5_OA_PropertyOddEvenSums_ThinkPairShare_Critique

PDF version: 5_OA_PropertyOddEvenSums_ThinkPairShare_Critique

Gr 4_NBT_Multiplication_ThinkPairShare_Critique_Statement

This multi-digit multiplication task was used with fourth-grade students. Students are asked to critique a statement on if two numbers multiplied together are equal to two numbers added together. After an initial conjecture, students share their ideas with a partner and identify similarities and differences between the two arguments. This task contains argumentative language, including claim and evidence.

Microsoft Word version: 4_NBT_Multiplication_ThinkPairShare_Critique_1

PDF version: 4_NBT_Multiplication_ThinkPairShare_Critique_1

Gr 4_NBT_Multiplication_ThinkPairShare_Critique

This task is designed as a think-pair-share. It sets a multiplication expression equal to an addition expression and asks students to agree or disagree about the equality. Fourth grade students are given a template to state a claim, and explain it, then compare arguments. This task can be used to open a class discussion about different ways to think about double digit multiplication. Students can look at 10×24 as (10×20)+(10×4) which would show the comparison between 10×24 and 200+40 nicely.

Microsoft Word version: 4_NBT_Multiplication_ThinkPairShare_Critique

PDF version: 4_NBT_Multiplication_ThinkPairShare_Critique

Gr 3_OA_PropertyCommutativeAddition_ThinkPairShare_Construct

This think-pair-share task is provided for third-grade students to understand the commutative property for addition. Using a statement with single-digit numbers, students must construct an argument on whether the true statement is correct and share their ideas with a partner. A graphic organizer is provided to help students create their claim and evidence, as well as record their partner’s ideas and any similarities/differences.

Microsoft Word version: 3_OA_PropertyCommutativeAddition_ThinkPairShare_Construct

PDF version: 3_OA_PropertyCommutativeAddition_ThinkPairShare_Construct

Gr 3_NF_FractionsEquivalence_ThinkPairShare_Critique

I used this task in my 3rd grade classroom as an introduction to equivalent fractions. Students were given a visual, as well as a written description of 2 different ways that students split a pizza. The idea was for students to shade in fraction pieces and see that the 2 fractions were equivalent, however students were not told how to go about solving the problem. The task gives students a place to write their claim and argument, as well as a place to write what their partner thinks.

Microsoft Word version: 3_NF_FractionsEquivalence_ThinkPairShare_Critique

PDF version: 3_NF_FractionsEquivalence_ThinkPairShare_Critique

Gr 3_NBT_RoundingNearestHundred_ThinkPairShare_Conjecture

This task is designed for third graders to introduce rounding numbers to the nearest hundred. The task instructions include background knowledge on rounding to the nearest ten and argumentative language when asking the students to create a conjecture about how to round and how rounding to the nearest hundred compares to the nearest ten. Students are asked to practice the idea using a three-digit number.

Microsoft Word version: 3_NBT_RoundingNearestHundred_ThinkPairShare_Conjecture

PDF version: 3_NBT_RoundingNearestHundred_ThinkPairShare_Conjecture

Gr 3_NBT_Rounding_ThinkPairShare_Construct

This task requires third grade students to find a halfway point between two numbers (30 and 40) and construct an argument explaining how he or she knows that their number is the halfway point. Students are also asked to engage in a think-pair-share in which they discuss the process with a partner. The task may lead to a good discussion about medians or about rounding and how to round to the nearest tenth when a number ends in a 5.

Microsoft Word version: 3_NBT_Rounding_ThinkPairShare_Construct

PDF version: 3_NBT_Rounding_ThinkPairShare_Construct

Gr 2_NBT_PropertiesCommutative_ThinkPairShare_Construct

I used this task early on for my 3rd grade class. The reason for giving this task was to allow students to see and recognize the commutative property of addition. The problem is very basic, and allows space for students to give their claim and argument, and also to have a discussion with a partner. Students struggled with understanding what the word “equals” means. They were not used to seeing an equation after the equal sign. Once students understood that equals actually means “the same,” they had a better understanding of how the commutative property works.

Microsoft Word version: 2_NBT_PropertiesCommutative_ThinkPairShare_Construct

PDF version: 2_NBT_PropertiesCommutative_ThinkPairShare_Construct